Saturday, October 29, 2011

UFO, Aliens, (UCLA) Out of Body Experience Study Misleading, Pictures

Misleading and Erroneous Headlines!(About a bogus UFO/Alien study)

The headline that I am referring to reads:


"Mass Alien Abduction Experiment" in Los Angeles

This particular headline is from PRWeb, but there are many similar headlines about the same "study."

My Interest
My email has been overrun with information about this study, so I decided to take a look and see how legitimate it was. After all, if most of the headlines were correct, this would have been a major break through concerning UFO sightings and alien abductions, a subject that has perplexed millions people and experts alike for a long time. 
Richard 
The Study
Lets be clear, a two day (more precisely a two night study) consisting of 20 people is not a mass experiment. Also the study did not set out to prove or disprove UFO sightings or alien abductions, it clearly states that it set out to "disprove" these events. The detail of who the subjects were, if they were paid or not is virtually non existent. The most they give us is that that the study consisted of 70% men and 30% woman. The only other thing we get from reading the press release is that they were people that "fell asleep fast". 


The Purpose
Michael Raduga 
the prolific book writer.
So what possible motivation would Mr. Raduga have for conducting such a study. Two things come to mind. First, to be the agent of confusion, to provide misinformation to make the entire UFO/alien issue difficult for everyone to truly understand. This certainly serves a useful purpose for the military and the government. Second and much more likely is to sell another book, he has written ten books and we will probably see and eleventh book originating from this weak, bogus study of twenty unknown people for a two day period! 


Headlines 
It is common now for the media to run with a headline that bares no resemblance to the story underneath that headline. This is very true with political stories but it has spread across the entire spectrum of news reporting. Lets be honest, headlines about UFOs and Aliens is attention grabbing stuff and the more outrageous your headline the more readers or viewers you are likely to get! To many in the media the story is the headline and not the words printed below! 

What a real "mass study" looks like
I was recently contacted at first by phone, a recorded message from a major University (one that everyone would recognize) saying I had been selected as a possible participant in a in a study. Two days later a letter turns up saying that this university is conducting a major study to determine if fish oil supplements help prevent heart disease.  The study would be conducted using "7000" participants over a "5" year period. They said half would be taking placebo's and half real fish oil. It went on to say that a "flip of the coin" would determine who received placebo's or the real thing (I often wondered how they determined that). There was an extensive medical questionnaire that needed to be completed and it went on to say that they would supply the drug for free but there would be no compensation. I declined participation but my point is; this is a real mass study! 

The Truth
This "experiment" was NOT sponsored/supported by UCLA! The OOBE "Center" doesn't have a location (check their web page). The "experimenters" rented a hall at UCLA (i.e. Covel Commons), taught 20 volunteers their method for inducing OOBEs plus "subjects were instructed to find "extraterrestrials" or UFOs in their room, in neighboring rooms, beyond the window, or outside." There was no control group and no report published in any peer-reviewed (or non-peer-reviewed) journal.


The OOBE (Out OF Body Experience) Disclaimer
Over its extensive didactic and analytical experience, the OOBE Research Center has developed indicators and procedures for distinguishing real out-of-body experiences from fabrication and fantasy. No dubious responses were included in the statistics, and the probability of a subject fabricating or exaggerating an account is estimated at less than 10 percent. This experiment’s data is thus vastly more reliable than that of typical alien encounter “eyewitness accounts” that never undergo verification.

Read the Press Release Here
Read the PRWeb "Mass Experiment" Headline Here
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