Tuesday, October 29, 2019

The Truth About The UFO Phenomena Is Witnessing A Tipping Point

UFOs Are Real

Michio Kaku, a world-renowned theoretical physicist says the burden of proof has shifted. The Navy admits that several UFO videos are real and show aerial phenomena that they can't currently explain. Michio Kaku appeared at Fox News,  to speak about navy UFO incidents.
" The evidence is overwhelming. We have all this information from US navy pilots. We now have metrics. We can actually measure how fast they travel, how high they`re and what kind of centrifugal forces that they can experience. Science is based on things that are testable, reproducible and falsifiable. Now we have testable information... a game-changer"

Sunday, October 27, 2019

Pilot Talks With Extraterrestrial About Engineering UFOs

Pilot Converses With An Alien For The Military About Back Engineering UFOs

Bill Uhouse, a retired US marine pilot, worked on flying disk flight simulators, met and conversed with an alien on design issues, flew in a human-built flying disk, e He indicates that the UFO from Kingman Arizona (1952\3) was used for back-engineering. He seems to indicate that the aliens gave that craft to the U. S. military.

Bill was working on the flight simulator starting in 1954. He theorizes about how the black triangle ufo crafts, often observed, are constructed.

I find Bill highly credible. His disclosure in this interview, from the year 2000, indicates that the secret space program has been flying for 70 years.


Thursday, October 17, 2019

The World Needs To Realign Their Reality Because UFOs are Real



UFOs exist and everyone needs to adjust to that fact



The term “UFO” automatically triggers derision in most quarters of polite society. One of Christopher Buckley’s better satires, “Little Green Men,” is premised on a George F. Will-type pundit thinking that he has been abducted by aliens, with amusing results. UFOs have historically been associated with crackpot ideas like Big Foot or conspiracy theories involving crop circles.
The obvious reason for this is that the term “UFO” is usually assumed to be a synonym for “extraterrestrial life.” If you think about it, this is odd. UFO literally stands for “unidentified flying object.” A UFO is not necessarily an alien from another planet. It is simply a flying object that cannot be explained away through conventional means. Because UFOs are usually brought up only to crack jokes, however, they have been dismissed for decades.
One of the gutsiest working paper presentations I have witnessed was Alexander Wendt and Raymond Duvall presenting a draft version of “Sovereignty and the UFO.” In that paper, eventually published in the journal Political Theory, Wendt and Duvall argued that state sovereignty as we understand it is anthropocentric, or “constituted and organized by reference to human beings alone.” They argued that the real reason UFOs have been dismissed is because of the existential challenge that they pose for a worldview in which human beings are the most technologically advanced life-forms:
UFOs have never been systematically investigated by science or the state, because it is assumed to be known that none are extraterrestrial. Yet in fact this is not known, which makes the UFO taboo puzzling given the ET possibility.... The puzzle is explained by the functional imperatives of anthropocentric sovereignty, which cannot decide a UFO exception to anthropocentrism while preserving the ability to make such a decision. The UFO can be “known” only by not asking what it is.
When Wendt and Duvall made this argument, there were a lot of titters in the audience. I chuckled, too. Nonetheless, their paper makes a persuasive case that UFOs certainly exist, even if they are not necessarily ETs. For them, the key is that no official authority takes seriously the idea that UFOs can be extraterrestrials. As they note, “considerable work goes into ignoring UFOs, constituting them as objects only of ridicule and scorn.”
In recent years, however, there has been a subtle shift that poses some interesting questions for their argument. For one thing, discussion of actual UFOs has been the topic of some serious mainstream media coverage. There was the December 2017 New York Times story by Helene Cooper, Ralph Blumenthal and Leslie Kean about the Defense Department’s Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program, which was tasked with cataloguing UFOs recorded by military pilots. DoD officials confirmed its existence. Though this story generated some justified skepticism, it represented the first time the U.S. government acknowledged the existence of such a program.
Then, there were the reports last November about Oumuamua, “a mysterious, cigar-shaped interstellar object [that] fell through our solar system at an extraordinary speed,” according to New York’s Eric Levits. Oumuamua’s shape and trajectory were unusual enough for some genuine astrophysicists to publish a paper suggesting the possibility that it was an artificial construction relying on a solar sail. Again, this prompted skeptical reactions, but even those skeptics could not completely rule out the possibility that extraterrestrial activity was involved.
Then, on Monday, the New York Times came out with another story by the same reporters who broke the 2017 story:
The strange objects, one of them like a spinning top moving against the wind, appeared almost daily from the summer of 2014 to March 2015, high in the skies over the East Coast. Navy pilots reported to their superiors that the objects had no visible engine or infrared exhaust plumes, but that they could reach 30,000 feet and hypersonic speeds.
“These things would be out there all day,” said Lt. Ryan Graves, an F/A-18 Super Hornet pilot who has been with the Navy for 10 years, and who reported his sightings to the Pentagon and Congress. “Keeping an aircraft in the air requires a significant amount of energy. With the speeds we observed, 12 hours in the air is 11 hours longer than we’d expect.”....
No one in the Defense Department is saying that the objects were extraterrestrial, and experts emphasize that earthly explanations can generally be found for such incidents. Lieutenant Graves and four other Navy pilots, who said in interviews with The New York Times that they saw the objects in 2014 and 2015 in training maneuvers from Virginia to Florida off the aircraft carrier Theodore Roosevelt, make no assertions of their provenance.

The Times reporters broke new ground by getting pilots on record. What is interesting about this latest news cycle, however, is that DoD officials are not behaving as Wendt and Duvall would predict. Indeed, Politico’s Bryan Bender reported last month that, “The U.S. Navy is drafting new guidelines for pilots and other personnel to report encounters with ‘unidentified aircraft,’ a significant new step in creating a formal process to collect and analyze the unexplained sightings — and destigmatize them.” My Post colleague Deanna Paul followed up by reporting that “Luis Elizondo, a former senior intelligence officer, told The Post that the new Navy guidelines formalized the reporting process, facilitating data-driven analysis while removing the stigma from talking about UFOs, calling it ‘the single greatest decision the Navy has made in decades.’ ”
What appears to be happening is that official organs of the state are now acknowledging that UFOs exist, even if they are not literally using the term. They are doing so because enough pilots are reporting UFOs and near-air collisions so as to warrant better record-keeping. They are not saying that these UFOs are extraterrestrials, but they are trying to destigmatize the reporting of a UFO.
Still, the very fact that this step has been taken somewhat weakens the Wendt and Duvall thesis. This was always a two-step process: (a) Acknowledge that UFOs exist; and (b) Consider that the UFOs might be ETs.
In recent years, the U.S. national security bureaucracy has met the first criterion. What happens to our understanding of the universe if great powers meet that second one?

Saturday, October 5, 2019

Clear Video of UFOs in The Outer Banks North Carolina

Strange lights off the Outer Banks spark UFO debate: Was it aliens or the military?





A man visiting the Outer Banks, North Carolina recorded a cluster of lights in September 2019 that many people claim are UFOs. Others believe they are military flares. 

A fleet of lights recorded off North Carolina’s Outer Banks has ignited a debate about whether they are honest-to-goodness UFOs or just part of a mysterious military exercise.

William Guy posted a 31-second video Sept. 28 on YouTube, showing what appears to be 14 glowing orbs over the water. He refers to it as a “real UFO sighting.”

“Anybody tell me what that is?” Guy says in the video. “We’re in the middle of the ocean, on a ferry, nothing around. Look. Nothing around. No land, no nothing.

Wednesday, September 18, 2019

Navy Admits The Truth About Mysterious UFO Videos

UFO videos are footage of real 'unidentified' objects, US Navy acknowledges

For the first time, the U.S. Navy has acknowledged that the three UFO videos that were released by former Blink-182 singer Tom DeLonge and published by The New York Times are of real "unidentified" objects.
“The Navy considers the phenomena contained/depicted in those three videos as unidentified," Navy spokesman Joseph Gradisher told The Black Vault, a website dedicated to declassified government documents.
Gradisher added that “the ‘Unidentified Aerial Phenomena’ terminology is used because it provides the basic descriptor for the sightings/observations of unauthorized/unidentified aircraft/objects that have been observed entering/operating in the airspace of various military-controlled training ranges.”
The statement has been corroborated with other media outlets. Fox News has reached out to the Navy for additional comment for this story.
The videos in question, known as "FLIR1,” “Gimbal” and “GoFast,” were originally released to the New York Times and to The Stars Academy of Arts & Science (TTSA). In December 2017, Fox News reported that the Pentagon had secretly set up a program to investigate UFOs at the request of former Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev.
In June 2019, Reid, now retired, expressed his desire for lawmakers to hold public hearings into what the military knows. "They would be surprised how the American public would accept it," he said during a wide-ranging interview with a Nevada radio station. "People from their individual states would accept it."
The first video of the unidentified object was taken on Nov. 14, 2004, and shot by the F-18's gun camera. The second video was taken on Jan. 21, 2015, and shows another aerial vehicle with pilots commenting on how strange it is. The third video was also taken on Jan. 21, 2015, but it is unclear whether the third video was of the same object or a different one.
John Greenewald, Jr., who publishes The Black Vault, told Motherboard he was surprised at the language the Navy used in its official statement.
“I very much expected that when the U.S. military addressed the videos, they would coincide with a language we see on official documents that have now been released, and they would label them as ‘drones’ or ‘balloons,’” Greenwald told the news outlet. “However, they did not. They went on the record stating the ‘phenomena’ depicted in those videos, is ‘unidentified.’ That really made me surprised, intrigued, excited and motivated to push harder for the truth.
Luis Elizondo, the former head of the Pentagon's Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP), has previously said that people should pay attention to the comments the government is making about UFOs.
"What the pilots encountered that day was able to perform in ways that defied all logic and our current understanding of aerodynamics," Elizondo wrote in a Fox News op-ed of the 2004 encounter by U.S. Navy pilots who witnessed the object off the coast of San Diego. "Furthermore, beyond what the pilots saw with their own trained eye, the technological feat they encountered was further verified by the impressive Aegis SPY-1 radar, America’s premier radar system at the time, and even gun camera footage and sonar systems from submarines accompanying the carrier.
Earlier this year, the Navy issued new classified guidelines on how to report such instances “in response to unknown, advanced aircraft flying into or near Navy strike groups or other sensitive military facilities and formations.”
The Defense Department also briefed Senate Intelligence Committee Vice Chairman Mark Warner, D-Va., in June, along with two other senators, as part of what appeared to be heightened efforts to inform politicians about naval encounters with unidentified aircraft.
Warner's spokesperson indicated that the senator sought to probe safety concerns surrounding "unexplained interference" naval pilots faced, according to Politico. The outlet reported more briefings were being requested as news surfaced that the Navy revised its procedures for personnel reporting on unusual aircraft sightings.
President Trump said he has been briefed on Navy pilots' reported sightings of unidentified flying objects, but remained skeptical of the existence of UFOs. "I want them to think whatever they think," Trump told ABC News' George Stephanopolous earlier this year, referring to the Navy pilots. "I did have one very brief meeting on it. But people are saying they’re seeing UFOs. Do I believe it? Not particularly."

Tuesday, September 10, 2019

New Study Reveals ET May Have Visited Earth

Alien civilizations may have explored the Milky Way and visited Earth already, new study claims


Our Milky Way galaxy could be filled with alien civilizations, a new study claims, but we don't know because they haven't stopped by Earth for a visit in millions of years.
According to a study published last month in The Astronomical Journal, extraterrestrial life might be taking its time to fully explore the galaxy, even using the movement of star systems to make this type of journey easier.
The scientists' work is the latest response to what's known as the Fermi paradox, which wonders why we have yet to detect signs of alien life.
Italian-American physicist Enrico Fermi famously said something to the effect of, "But where is everybody?" in reference to the possibility of star-hopping space aliens.
The new study claims the aliens may just be taking their time and being strategic.
"If you don't account for the motion of stars when you try to solve this problem, you're basically left with one of two solutions," Jonathan Carroll-Nellenback, a computational scientist and the study's lead author, told Business Insider. "Either nobody leaves their planet, or we are in fact the only technological civilization in the galaxy."
Stars, along with the planets around them, orbit the centre of the Milky Way on unique paths at varying speeds, and they sometimes zip past one another as they do, Business Insider reports.
Carroll-Nellenback's study points out that the aliens could simply be waiting for their next destination to come closer to them.

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