Monday, February 27, 2017

Wisconsin Witness Watched A UFO Emerge Out of Green Bay

Wisconsin witness sees UFO move out of water

A Wisconsin witness at Little Suamico reported watching a triangle-shaped object move out of Green Bay that appeared to be 100 to 150 feet in length, according to testimony in Case 80998 from the Mutual UFO Network (MUFON) witness reporting database.

Artist image of UFO emerging from water

Open Minds reports the incident occurred at 2:10 a.m. on November 28, 2016, as the witness was outside stargazing with several friends and neighbors. The case was investigated by Wisconsin MUFON Susan Birttnen and closed as an Unknown.

“He reports they witnessed a triangular-shaped object fly out of the water ofGreen Bay, traveling at approximately 35 knots,” Birttnen wrote in her report.“It was so close that they could hear a muffled jet sound. As it came out of the water it turned on its side as it traveled west and gained elevation.”

The witness provided a description of the object.

“The color was dark and it had blue flashing lights,” the witness stated.“The elevation was at 500 feet and the distance was less than 1,000 feet. The side of the triangle was between100 to150 feet.”

The witness believes the object may be something operated by the U.S. Air Force.

“I believe they are investigating the saucers and the orbs in some joint effort,” the witness stated.

The city of Little Suamico is located in Oconto County and is on the Bay of Green Bay. It is in the northeastern part of Wisconsin and part of the Green Bay Metropolitan Statistical Area. The Austin Straubel International Airport is 16 miles away.The Outagamie County Regional Airport is 39 miles away.

“Based on the evidence and the data provided by the witness,” Birttnen wrote,“I conclude that this case is in the Unknown UAV Category.”

Friday, February 24, 2017

People Feel Good When They See A UFO

This Neuroscientist Wants to Know Why People Who See UFOs Feel So Good

Most scientists dismiss ufology, the study of UFOs, as a pseudoscience. Dr.
Bob Davis wants to change that.
Each year, Phoenix, Arizona hosts the International UFO Congress, the largest annual gathering dedicated to the study of this phenomenon, otherwise known as ufology. One of the most striking things I noticed while speaking with attendees at this year's congress was their insistence on the reality of UFOs, even before I had expressed any doubt. Ufologists always seem to be on the defensive, a conversational tic that is undoubtedly learned from years of speaking with skeptics.
In other words, ufologists will always be the first ones to let you know that they don't believe in UFOs, they know they are real. But the gap between belief and knowledge is a large one, a chasm that separates the scientific and the pseudoscientific. Since ufology became something of an organized field of study, albeit a fringe one, in the 1950s, the overwhelming majority of the scientific community hasn't hesitated to label the field as pseudoscientific, much to the ire of ufologists.
Although the US government has launched formal inquiries into the UFO phenomenon, little has changed in the last six decades to indicate that ufology will ever be anything more than pseudoscientific. But Bob Davis, a retired neuroscientist and self-described "UFO agnostic," wants to change that. I caught up with him at the International UFO Congress to find out why he thinks ufology can become a serious scientific discipline. Our conversation has been lightly edited for clarity and length.
 Motherboard: Hey Bob! You're a retired neuroscientist, but most scientists don't take UFOs seriously. What gives?
Bob Davis: I've been a closet ufologist my whole life, I guess because of the fear of ridicule by others. When my wife and I visited Sedona, Arizona a couple of years ago, we happened to see two orange orbs in the night sky. I'm not entirely sure what that was all about, but that motivated me to start writing a book: The UFO Phenomenon. Now I'm a member of the Dr. Mitchell Foundation for Research into Extraterrestrial Encounters, which is exploring the essence of that phenomenon.
What kind of research does this organization do?
We have studied 3057 individuals who have claimed to have conscious, explicit memory of contact with a physical craft associated with some form of non-human intelligence.
What did you find based on this research?
Ufologists have always thought that this phenomenon was a negative or hostile experience, but we're finding just the opposite. What we've found is that about 85 percent of the people who are experiencing this phenomenon are being transformed in a very positive behavioral or psychospiritual way. Generally, people become more humane, experience a oneness with the world. They become less interested in organized religion, they become more spiritual, they have less interest in monetary values, and become more sensitive to the ecological welfare of our planet, among many other psychospiritual outcomes. It is a real and powerful outcome that is generally ignored by the UFO community.
Any idea why?
We believe, but we don't pretend we have the answer, but we feel that the quantum holographic theory of consciousness outlined by Dr. Edgar Mitchell, the co-founder of FREE, provides a possible explanation of the essence of the phenomena. We base that again, in part, on the transformative aspects the experience has on the individual. People are reporting that they become aware, based on their interaction with the phenomenon, that there is indeed a multi-dimensional reality, that there is life after death. We're trying to apply, in other words, is a scientific explanation, but not claiming we have the answer.
Has the psychological community acknowledged this research?
Our results will appear in two journals later this year, the Journal of Consciousness and The Journal of Scientific Exploration.
Journal of Consciousness isn't peer reviewed, and The Journal of Scientific Exploration is considered pretty fringe by most scientists.
We're not saying we have irrefutable evidence of what this phenomenon is about, we simply want to present our results and increase public awareness, especially that of the mainstream so they can take this topic much more seriously. Once we publish our results in these journals, hopefully it will stimulate more interest and attention, and hopefully research that builds upon our preliminary findings.
Did you notice any similarities between people who were reporting these experiences?
The obvious question is whether these individuals might be having an illusion or a fantasy proneness, some aberrant psychological pathology that might give rise to their contentions that they're behaviorally transformed. That's discounted to a large extent because if they were in fact having some type of psychological aberration to begin with, it would be very unlikely that they'd report such positive behavioral outcomes as a result of their interaction with this phenomenon. The fact that so many, about 85 percent, say the same thing, also diminishes the possibility that there is an underlying psychological aberration associated with it. Unfortunately we didn't have the time and money to screen all individuals for some psychological problem. Future research should look at that component of the individual who is reporting this kind of experience.
It sounds like a religious experience that these people are describing.
Many of these positive transformations are similar to a spiritual awakening. Call it psychospirtual, call it religious, call it whatever, but the vast majority of these people are transformed in a very positive way.
Do you think UFOs are extraterrestrial in origin, or unexplained earthly phenomenon, like a military craft or something?
Most ufologists claim that this phenomenon is extraterrestrial in nature, but science has to look at other explanations. Unfortunately it will probably still continue to be viewed as a pseudoscience by the general scientific community, which is highly unfortunate because this phenomenon is valid and is impacting of thousands of people worldwide. Without question we have to make it more scientifically rigorous. The confounding variable is that we don't, at the present time, have the scientific principles to apply to help answer the underlying essence of what governs and regulates this phenomenon. We're probably not going to ever have irrefutable evidence to what this phenomenon is all about. We can only indirectly make conclusions. Maybe over time these principles will evolve, and that can be more specifically applied as a means to qualify and quantify largely anecdotal evidence which is what we have from thousands of experiences. Anecdotal evidence can't be measured in a laboratory and most scientists want tangible data.
What would that look like in this case? Actually capturing a UFO?
That would be the smoking gun. Many contend we do have UFOs being housed wherever. People contend they have the answer, but we don't know who or what to believe. Ufology is littered with such disinformation, people that make up conclusions without sufficient evidence. It's very hard to separate fact from fiction, sense from nonsense, which is largely why most scientists consider it at best a pseudoscience and don't want to become involved. Plus there's no granting agency that is going to provide funding for scientists to engage in this type of research, so that also turns off a lot of the scientific community, especially in the academic setting.
You spent 30 years as a neuroscientist, but now you don't doubt ufology as a legitimate area of study. What would it take to convince other scientists to take this seriously?
There are many scientists who are interested in the phenomenon and take it seriously. But it needs to be more so, a research effort by researchers from many scientific disciplines working in a collaborative fashion to study this phenomenon with much more serious intent. There's an obvious fear of ridicule, so people don't reveal interest in this area. It's unfortunate because the scientific community should be more engaged rather than being largely dissociated from studying the phenomenon. Although Organizations like the Mutual UFO Network devote a lot of time studying UFOs, but continuing to analyze this phenomenon in the manner that they do, which is a retrospective analysis of prior events, is not going to advance our understanding of the phenomenon. We need to apply more rigorous scientific protocols, using a multi-disciplinary approach. I believe that's going to be the only way we're going to gain greater insights into the phenomenon.

Thursday, February 23, 2017

NASA Discovers New Solar System That Could House Life

Nasa's 'holy grail': Entire new solar system that could support alien life discovered



Nasa has announced that Scientists have found a new solar system filled with planets that look like Earth and could support life.

At least three of the seven planets represent the “holy grail for planet-hunting astronomers”, because they sit within the “temperate zone” and are the right temperature to allow alien life to flourish, the researchers have said. And they are capable of having oceans, again suggesting that life could flourish on them.
No other star system has ever been found to contain so many Earth-sized and rocky planets, of the kind thought to be necessary to contain aliens.
The researchers might soon be able to find evidence of life on the planets, they have said. British astronomer Dr Chris Copperwheat, from Liverpool John Moores University, who was part of the international team, said: “The discovery of multiple rocky planets with surface temperatures which allow for liquid water make this amazing system an exciting future target in the search for life."
Any evidence of life is likely to be “strong, very strong or conclusive”, the scientists said. It will be done by looking for what molecules are in the atmosphere – if they were to find things like oxygen, and in the right amounts, then it would probably indicate that there was biological activity.
Life Exists Outside of Earth

But there is a big problem with this announcement: We already know much more than this, including that life exists outside of Earth.

“It’s the first time that so many planets of this kind are found around a same star,” Michaël Gillon, the lead author of the Nature paper announcing the discovery, said in a press conference. “The seven planets … could have some liquid water and maybe life on the surface.”

The seven exoplanets orbit a star in the constellation Aquarius called Trappist-1. And it’s a solar system said to differ greatly from our own.

Their sun, or ‘star’, has scientists fascinated because it is much smaller than our own, with an estimated one-tenth the mass of our sun and about one-thousandth its brightness. The good news for potential life on those planets is that the star’s low mass allows its planets to orbit it very closely and remain in the habitable zone.





The Challenge?

NASA seems to be holding back. Why? Information is obviously controlled and let out very slowly for specific reasons, and that could be a good thing. But at the same time, they have been hiding the truth from the public for a very long time.

This has been proven through the bevy of military, intelligence community, and even NASA whistleblowers who have come forth talking about this secrecy, as well as the known fact of life beyond Earth.




Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Video of Bizarre Large Water Spout Reveals a UFO

UFO Video Of Large Bizarre Water Spout Reveals UFO

The white light to the right of this water spout is not the sun. The light is emanating from above the clouds the object is clearly a UFO. 


Posters Comments
That is a very unusual shape for a spout and the way it went back up so straight was weird. I saw a little bright light come from the right and then behind it and move in front and then off to the the right side of it before went up before the " spout" Plane maybe. . And very cool. Watch it on the big screen

Monday, February 20, 2017

UFO Gets Hit By Lightening During Recent Storm


UFO Hit By Lightning

During a recent thunderstorm in the U.S, a UFO appeared. It's not clear whether the UFO got hit by the lightning strike or whether it was using the lightning for its energy. After the lightning strike the UFO becomes visible for 30 seconds and illuminates the sky and the surrounding area. Then a second lightning strike is heard and the UFO disappears. When the UFO disappears the area turns dark again.

I made a short video analysis of the footage to explain what happened.

Did the UFO open up a portal in order to travel to another dimension?

Sunday, February 19, 2017

Churchill's Lost Essay Surfaces Revealing His Views On Extraterrestrials

Winston Churchill's Views on Aliens Revealed in Lost Essay



Churchill's memo talks about ET
A newly unearthed essay by Winston Churchill reveals he was open to the possibility of life on other planets.

In 1939, the year World War Two broke out, Churchill penned a popular science article in which he mused about the likelihood of extra-terrestrial life.

The 11-page typed draft, probably intended for a newspaper, was updated in the 1950s but never published.

In the 1980s, the essay was passed to a US museum, where it sat until its rediscovery last year.

The document was uncovered in the National Churchill Museum in Fulton, Missouri, by the institution's new director Timothy Riley. Mr Riley then passed it to the Israeli astrophysicist and author Mario Livio who describes the contents in the latest issue of Nature journal.

Churchill's interest in science is well-known: he was the first British prime minister to employ a science adviser, Frederick Lindemann, and met regularly with scientists such as Sir Bernard Lovell, a pioneer of radio astronomy.

This documented engagement with the scientific community was partly related to the war effort, but he is credited with funding UK laboratories, telescopes and technology development that spawned post-war discoveries in fields from molecular genetics to X-ray crystallography.
In the essay, Churchill outlines the concept of habitable zones - more than 50 years before the discovery of exoplanets

Despite this background, Dr Livio described the discovery of the essay as a "great surprise".

He told the BBC's Inside Science programme: "[Mr Riley] said, 'I would like you to take a look at something.' He gave me a copy of this essay by Churchill. I saw the title, Are We Alone in the Universe? and I said, 'What? Churchill wrote about something like this?'"

Dr Livio says the wartime leader reasoned like a scientist about the likelihood of life on other planets.

Churchill's thinking mirrors many modern arguments in astrobiology - the study of the potential for life on other planets. In his essay, the former prime minister builds on the Copernican Principle - the idea that human life on Earth shouldn't be unique given the vastness of the Universe.

Churchill defined life as the ability to "breed and multiply" and noted the vital importance of liquid water, explaining: "all living things of the type we know require [it]."

More than 50 years before the discovery of exoplanets, he considered the likelihood that other stars would host planets, concluding that a large fraction of these distant worlds "will be the right size to keep on their surface water and possibly an atmosphere of some sort". He also surmised that some would be "at the proper distance from their parent sun to maintain a suitable temperature".

Churchill also outlined what scientists now describe as the "habitable" or "Goldilocks" zone - the narrow region around a star where it is neither too hot nor too cold for life.

Correctly, the essay predicts great opportunities for exploration of the Solar System.

"One day, possibly even in the not very distant future, it may be possible to travel to the Moon, or even to Venus and Mars," Churchill wrote.

But the politician concluded that Venus and Earth were the only places in the Solar System capable of hosting life, whereas we now know that icy moons around Jupiter and Saturn are promising targets in the search for extra-terrestrial biology. However, such observations are forgivable given scientific knowledge at the time of writing.

In an apparent reference to the troubling events unfolding in Europe, Churchill wrote: "I for one, am not so immensely impressed by the success we are making of our civilisation here that I am prepared to think we are the only spot in this immense universe which contains living, thinking creatures, or that we are the highest type of mental and physical development which has ever appeared in the vast compass of space and time."

Churchill was a prolific writer: in the 1920s and 30s, he penned popular science essays on topics as diverse as evolution and fusion power. Mr Riley, director of the Churchill Museum, believes the essay on alien life was written at the former prime minister's home in Chartwell in 1939, before World War II broke out.

It may have been informed by conversations with the wartime leader's friend, Lindemann, who was a physicist, and might have been intended for publication in the News of the World newspaper.

It was also written soon after the 1938 US radio broadcast by Orson Welles dramatising The War of the Worlds by HG Wells. The radio programme sparked a panic when it was mistaken by some listeners for a real news report about the invasion of Earth by Martians.

Dr Livio told BBC News that there were no firm plans to publish the article because of issues surrounding the copyright. However, he said the Churchill Museum was working to resolve these so that the historically important essay can eventually see the light of day.

Dr Livio says the wartime leader reasoned like a scientist about the likelihood of life on other planets.

Churchill's thinking mirrors many modern arguments in astrobiology - the study of the potential for life on other planets. In his essay, the former prime minister builds on the Copernican Principle - the idea that human life on Earth shouldn't be unique given the vastness of the Universe.

Churchill defined life as the ability to "breed and multiply" and noted the vital importance of liquid water, explaining: "all living things of the type we know require [it]."

More than 50 years before the discovery of exoplanets, he considered the likelihood that other stars would host planets, concluding that a large fraction of these distant worlds "will be the right size to keep on their surface water and possibly an atmosphere of some sort". He also surmised that some would be "at the proper distance from their parent sun to maintain a suitable temperature".

Churchill also outlined what scientists now describe as the "habitable" or "Goldilocks" zone - the narrow region around a star where it is neither too hot nor too cold for life.

Correctly, the essay predicts great opportunities for exploration of the Solar System.

"One day, possibly even in the not very distant future, it may be possible to travel to the Moon, or even to Venus and Mars," Churchill wrote.

But the politician concluded that Venus and Earth were the only places in the Solar System capable of hosting life, whereas we now know that icy moons around Jupiter and Saturn are promising targets in the search for extra-terrestrial biology. However, such observations are forgivable given scientific knowledge at the time of writing.

In an apparent reference to the troubling events unfolding in Europe, Churchill wrote: "I for one, am not so immensely impressed by the success we are making of our civilisation here that I am prepared to think we are the only spot in this immense universe which contains living, thinking creatures, or that we are the highest type of mental and physical development which has ever appeared in the vast compass of space and time."

Churchill was a prolific writer: in the 1920s and 30s, he penned popular science essays on topics as diverse as evolution and fusion power. Mr Riley, director of the Churchill Museum, believes the essay on alien life was written at the former prime minister's home in Chartwell in 1939, before World War II broke out.

It may have been informed by conversations with the wartime leader's friend, Lindemann, who was a physicist, and might have been intended for publication in the News of the World newspaper.

It was also written soon after the 1938 US radio broadcast by Orson Welles dramatising The War of the Worlds by HG Wells. The radio programme sparked a panic when it was mistaken by some listeners for a real news report about the invasion of Earth by Martians.

Dr Livio told BBC News that there were no firm plans to publish the article because of issues surrounding the copyright. However, he said the Churchill Museum was working to resolve these so that the historically important essay can eventually see the light of day.



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